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Abstract

In its aim to become a global security actor, the EU is increasingly
undertaking civilian and military crisis missions all over
the world. These missions are based on the European security and
defence policy (ESDP) which forms an integral part of its common foreign
and security policy (CFSP). The Treaty of Lisbon seems to mirror
the Union’s global security ambitions as it addresses the European
security and defence policy in a whole new treaty section. However,
European missions still depend on willing Member States to make civilian
and military capabilities available to the Union for the implementation
of its security and defence policy. The purpose of this article
is to examine the relationship between the European Union and the
Member States in the fi eld of the common foreign and security policy
and the European security and defence policy and whether the Treaty
of Lisbon manages to clarify the situation. What constraints, if any, do
the common foreign and security policy and the European security and
defence policy impose on the Member States regarding the conduct of
their national foreign policy? The article argues that the relationship
between the EU and the Member States can only be determined after
an examination of the binding nature of primary and secondary CFSP
law as well as of international agreements concluded by the Union.